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SPECIAL  RELEASE

 

11 May 2012

Food Security Group

 

Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics

 

Michigan State University

May 11, 2012 special release bulletin

Michigan State University's Food Security Group is pleased to share with you the following papers and presentation:

 

Non-Timber Forest Products and Rural Poverty Alleviation in Zambia. Brian P. Mulenga, Robert B. Richardson, and Gelson Tembo. IAPRI Working Paper 62. April 2012.

 

The Contribution of Non-Timber Forest Products to Rural Household Income in Zambia.  Brian P. Mulenga, Robert B. Richardson, Lawrence Mapemba, and Gelson Tembo. FSRP Working Paper No. 54.  June 2011.

 

Contribution of Non-Timber Forest Products to Rural Household Income in Zambia. Brian P. Mulenga, Robert B. Richardson, Lawrence Mapemba, and Gelson Tembo. FSRP Policy Synthesis No. 46, September 2011.

 

Seeing the forest for the fuel and food: Non-timber forest products and rural development in Zambia. Robert B. Richardson. GSO Brown Bag Seminar Series, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics. Michigan State University. April 10, 2012. Listen now.

 

Forest products play an important role in supporting rural livelihoods and food security in many developing countries. The integrity of forests is vital to world food security, mostly because of the dependence of the poor on forest resources. Studies of the role of forest products in household welfare in Zambia have found that such products are among the top sources of household income in some rural areas. These papers use statistical analysis to examine the role of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) in rural household welfare in Zambia, with two main objectives. First, using rural household survey data, we estimate the share of NTFP income to total household income with the aim of assessing the proportion and distribution of business activities related to NTFPs. Second, we estimate the determinants of rural household participation in the extraction and trade of NTFPs, with an interest in the characteristics of households that are more dependent on forest products for income. The results show that poor households rely more on NTFPs than their wealthier counterparts. The implications of these findings call for integrated policies that reflect the dependence of the poor on forest resources and the management of forests for environmental sustainability.

 

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